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This is Why Chelsea Beat Manchester City

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Chelsea owner, Roman Abramovich got to watch his side claim the biggest prize in European football.

The Russian flew into Porto for last night’s Champions League final against Manchester City and, like Blues fans across the world, was a nervous spectator throughout.

The contest was settled by Kai Havertz’s first-half goal and after the full-time whistle was blown and the wild celebrations began on the pitch, Abramovich left his seat and made his way down to tunnel. He would watch the Blues lift the trophy at ground level.

Abramovich waited by the entrance to the tunnel at the Estadio do Dragao to congratulate every Chelsea player as they headed into the dressing room. His biggest greeting, though, was reserved for Cesar Azpilicueta.

The Spaniard and Abramovich shared a warm embrace before Azpilicuta, as captured by Chelsea’s in-house media, said: “It’s yours. I don’t know where the trophy is, but I’ll bring it to you.”

Chelsea’s Kai Havertz repaid some of his huge transfer fee as his first-half goal sealed a 1-0 win for his side over Manchester City in the Champions League final on Saturday.

The German youngster, Chelsea’s record signing, latched on to Mason Mount’s pass and evaded City keeper Ederson before rolling the ball into an empty net in the 42nd minute.

Premier League champions City were favourites ahead of the final but suffered a desperately disappointing night in Porto in what was their first Champions League final.

Pep Guardiola’s side were never allowed to play their normal fluent game and could not respond as a disciplined Chelsea sealed a second Champions League triumph.

Chelsea boss Thomas Tuchel won the tactical battle against his City counterpart Guardiola and his side could have won by more had Timo Werner converted two gilt-edged chances.

City laboured after the break searching for openings and their cause was not helped when playmaker Kevin de Bruyne went off injured after a clash of heads.

Chelsea survived seven minutes of stoppage time with Riyad Mahrez going agonisingly close for City before the celebrations from Chelsea’s travelling fans could begin.

The London club may have finished fourth in the Premier League, a huge 19 points behind the champions City, but this, remarkably, was their third win over Guardiola’s side in six weeks.

They shattered City’s hopes of a domestic treble when they triumphed in the FA Cup semi-finals in April and then delayed their title celebrations with victory in Manchester.

Now, in a final watched by a limited crowd of just over 14,000 fans who created a raucous atmosphere, they have denied City the first Champions League crown they and Guardiola so crave.

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Sports

No Condom Distribution in Tokyo Olympic Village

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You may have to be extremely think twice before zipping down at the Tokyo Olympics Village because there is no distribution of condoms yet alcohol is allowed.

The organizing committee of this summer’s Tokyo Olympics said Sunday that participants will be allowed to bring alcoholic beverages into the athletes’ village for consumption in their rooms, as part of efforts to ensure the safety of the games amid the coronavirus pandemic.

To prevent the spread of the virus, the organizing committee said it will not distribute condoms to participants during their stay in the village but on their departure, a break from recent Olympic tradition.

Condoms have been given to participants since the 1988 Seoul Olympics to raise AIDS awareness, according to the committee.

With around a month to go until the start of the Olympics, five organizing bodies of the games, including the Japanese and Tokyo metropolitan governments and the International Olympic Committee, will decide (today) Monday on how many spectators will be allowed at venues.

According to sources privy with this matter, the organizers are considering allowing around 20,000 spectators for the Olympic opening ceremony late next month.

The spectator cap for the ceremony at the National Stadium on July 23 would include both ticket holders from the general public and officials related to the games, the sources said.

The Japanese government has said it will allow up to 10,000 people at events such as sports games and concerts in areas that are not under a COVID-19 state of emergency or a quasi-emergency, as long as they do not exceed 50% of venue capacity.

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World Rally Championship Returns To Kenya

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Motor sport enthusiasts will once again next week get a chance of enjoying racing cars in the worlds toughest race.

President Uhuru Kenyatta on Thursday said, it had taken the country years of negotiations and preparations to bring back the World Rally Championship (WRC) event after an 18-year absence.

“My hope and my prayer is that the manner in which we shall conduct ourselves over the next few days will be such that everybody will accept and understand that the Safari Rally is now here and is here to stay, and we’re not likely to lose it,” President Uhuru said.

He however, said, ” it will depend on not only with how you all perform, all the agencies involved will perform but how Kenyans themselves will behave,” the President said.

President Uhuru presented brand new rally cars to young Kenyan drivers Hamza Anwar (22), McRae Kimathi (26) and Jeremy Wahome (22). The three drivers are sponsored for the WRC Safari Rally by Safaricom and Kenya Airways.

According to organisers, 58 drivers have been confirmed for the event, 24 of them foreigners with the most prominent being Frenchman Sébastien Ogier who has claimed seven WRC titles in the last eight seasons.

The event, will take place in the scenic town of Naivasha in Nakuru County. It was restored to the WRC calendar following an intensive campaign led by President Uhuru.

Rose Wachuka, the Chief of Staff at the Ministry of Sports, Culture and Heritage, it is a “moment of pride” for Kenya.

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Tough Rules Set For Tokyo Olympics

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Tokyo the capital city of Japan is at the moment the most busy destination for athletes as they jet in ahead of the forthcoming Olympics.

According to the itenerary the Olympics open on July 23 followed by the Paralympic on August 24.

Organisers say say 15,400 athletes are expected for the Olympics and Paralympics.

Including athletes, the total number expected for both events, factoring in media, broadcasters, Olympic Family, sponsors and others is about 93,000.

With the deadly Covid-19 pandemic everywhere on the globe, the Tokyo Olympics will take place under strict guidelines aimed at preventing the spread of the virus that has killed 3.82million people globally.

All those entering Japan for the Olympics will be required to follow complex testing rules – before leaving home and after arriving.

They must also agree to have their location monitored by GPS, download several apps, sign a pledge to follow the rules, maintain social distancing, stay off public transportation for the first 14 days and keep organizers informed of your whereabouts.

“We expect everybody to follow the rules. But we also have to be aware there could be infractions,” said Olympic Games Operations Director Pierre Ducrey, also speaking remotely.

“Yes, we expect you to play by the rules, but if you don’t there will be sanctions that could be coming your way.”

Ducrey said the range of punishments could go from a warning, to temporary or permanent expulsion from the Olympics, to withdrawal of accreditation or a fine.

Officials also suggested the Japanese government has the power of deportation, and individual sports federations and national Olympic committees may have their own penalties.

Dubi declined to offer specifics about possible financial penalties. He said that would be determined by a disciplinary commission.

But he said rules would apply “before, during and after” athletes compete.

“It is to reinforce the message, which is: The Playbooks are there to be followed. No transgressions,” Dubi said.

Athletes are also being required to sign waivers, typical of the Olympics. This time an added clause relieves the IOC of responsibly from any fallout from COVID-19.

Dubi suggested athletes or national federations would have insurance coverage for most eventualities.

“Then there are a number of cases for which the risks cannot be covered and this is then the responsibility of the participants,” Dubi said. He said this was standard practice in the sports industry.

The International Olympic Committee says more that 80% of those staying in the Olympic Village will be fully vaccinated.

This contrasts with about 5% of the Japanese population that has been vaccinated in a slow rollout that is just now speeding up.

The Japanese medical community has largely opposed holding these Olympics in Tokyo, arguing the risks are too great.

The government’s main medical adviser Dr. Shigeru Omi has said it’s “abnormal” to hold the Olympics during a pandemic.

Tokyo and other regions of the country remain under a state of emergency that expires on Sunday.

Reports in Japan suggest the government is likely to lift the state of emergency but still impose rules on restaurant hours and other businesses that draw crowds.

Fans from abroad have been banned from Tokyo and organizers say a decision on having any local fans at Olympic venues will be announced by the end of the month.

Japan has officially spent $15.4 billion on organizing the Olympics, although government audits say the figure is much larger.

Jeff Shell, who heads NBCUniversal, said this week these Olympics might be the most profitable ever, despite the pandemic.

NBC, the American rights holder, is the single largest source of IOC income, representing about 40% of total income.

It paid the IOC about $4.4 billion for four Olympics from 2014 through 2020, and $7.75 billion more for six games – 2022 through 2032.

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