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Israel Army Reshapes Attack Battalions to Fit Modern Battlefield

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The changing battlefield requires changes to the battle doctrine and in the way units operate, a notion that is at the heart of the plan to reorganize and strengthen the IDF’s attack battalions.

As part of IDF Chief of Staff Lt.-Gen. Aviv Kohavi’s multi-year plan known as the “Tnufa” plan, the army’s Ground Forces Command was tasked to thoroughly examine changes to the modern battlefield, and establish a mechanism in which new techniques and technologies could be quickly assimilated in the different units.

The multi-domain “Ghost” unit was created for this job. Composed of experienced soldiers and officers of elite units from the Armored Corps, Artillery Corps, Air Defense Division and Air Force pilots, this unit was busy in the past year conducting experiments and developing new techniques that will multiply the strength of the maneuvering units.

This week marked a significant milestone in the process. For the first time, all the battalion commanders of the IDF’s Ground Forces gathered for a seminar at the Tze’elim Ground Forces training base to study and “multiply” a skill that the multi-domain unit developed, and essentially assimilate it in field units.

The skill is the “expose and destroy” company. A major element in the new battlefield is the way the enemy appears in first contact. If battles in the past were conducted in the open and the enemy was using the same technologies – like tanks and armored personnel carriers – the IDF’s current enemy, in both Lebanon and Gaza, employs guerrilla tactics – dubbed in military jargon as “the disappearing enemy.”

This enemy appears for seconds in a window, or pops out of tunnels, and uses civilian infrastructure to briefly come out, attack, and then hide again.

For this purpose, the IDF senior command decided that each battalion needs a force – as big as an entire company – that will have the ability to expose the enemy as quickly as possible and destroy it.

“The purpose of the exposure-attack company is to increase the lethality of the maneuvering force – whether it is a unit or a combined force – by exposing the enemy with advanced technologies, and then immediately categorizing it and destroying it,” Brig.-Gen. Dan Goldfus, head of the Infantry and Paratroopers Corps who led the seminar, told local press this week.

“This ability will allow the units to step up their ability to carry out more operations, and destroy more enemy forces.”

Battalion commanders exercise new combat skills at the “expose and destroy” seminar in Tze’elim in April 2020.

One of the concerns in the modern battlefield is that an area, like a village for example, could be taken by the IDF, but enemy combatants could still exist in underground tunnels.

That fact raised concern among IDF high-ranking officials: despite holding territory, a mission could not be completed without sterilizing it from enemy troops.

“We believe that this ability, on the tactical level, would allow forces to complete their mission,” Goldfus said.

“We want the maneuvering forces to have the ability to win over the enemy by exposing it, then having the right tools to decide who it wants to eliminate it.”

Some of the abilities that are now given to commanders in the field are advanced command and control systems, which will allow them to understand and share valuable information in real-time, while also being in touch with units of different nature – such as fighter jets and artillery batteries – in order to “close fire circles” as quickly as possible and engage with enemy targets.

Goldfus noted that this seminar in Tze’elim is unique in its nature, and could be seen as a historic event.

“We want all the battalion commanders in the maneuvering forces to understand the changes that the battlefield is going through, and understand the changes that their units are undergoing,” he said.

“We showed them how we [the senior command] want them to implement the techniques and abilities that we developed.

“This seminar is something that happens once in a generation. It’s not just another seminar; it’s not just another event that battalion commanders and other professionals come to and talk about professional issues.

What we see here is a revolution – we see the implementation of a perception that led to changing the structure of units.

“The army is considered a conservative organization when it comes to making changes, and here we are changing the way the maneuvering forces are working. We will hear a lot about this change in the future.”

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Rwanda No More Home To Cheapest Data in EAC

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Tanzania is now the place to be for anyone intending to fit in the world of seamless communication according to new adjustments made by the East African coastal nation.

For only $0.75, one gets a gigabyte of data in Tanzania making it the cheapest offer among countries in the regional bloc.

Rwanda which has been leading is now pushed below to second position with $1.25 for a gigabyte of data.

In comparison to other countries in the regional bloc, Uganda ($1.56) and Burundi ($2.10) while Kenya, which was second in East Africa last year charging $1.04, now charges $2.25 per gigabyte (GB).

These latest statistics are according to data released by British technology research firm Cable.

The report, Worldwide Mobile Data Pricing 2021, reveals that Somalia is no longer offering the most affordable mobile internet in Africa, moving to third, as Sudan and Algeria take the first and second places respectively.

“In Sudan, the cost of mobile internet is $0.27, cheapest in Africa and fifth in the world. Algeria is second at $0.51 and Somalia third at $0.60.

Israel is now offering the most affordable mobile internet in the world at $0.05, moving from second place last year. Israel is followed by Kyrgyzstan ($0.15), Fiji ($0.19), Italy ($0.27) and Sudan.

Dan Howdle, consumer telecoms analyst at Cable said many countries with cheap data have excellent mobile and fixed broadband infrastructure, enabling providers to offer large amounts of data, and bring down price per gigabyte.

“Others with less advanced broadband networks are heavily reliant on mobile data” he said. Nigeria and South Africa, which command high internet traffic from its tech savvy population are charging $0.88 and $2.67 respectively.

Countries with long-established, ubiquitous 4G or new 5G infrastructure, the study points out, tend to fall towards the cheaper end of the table.

“This is due to the fact that mobile data plans have escalated far beyond the 1-10GB per month median, offering instead plans with caps in the hundreds of gigabytes, or even completely unlimited.

The cost per gigabyte in these countries will tend therefore to be very low.

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Tech

Rwanda Showcases e-Mobility Technology

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Rwanda’s Infrastructure Ministry is this Tuesday showcasing the e-Mobility Technology – an event that will go through until 2PM later in the day.

The showcase is organised in partnership with Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) and The Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI).

According to REMA, “vehicular emissions are the largest contributor to air pollution in Rwanda’s urban centres,” this showcase therefore is exhibiting innovations that seek to cut down on such emissions.

This inaugural event also seeks to demonstrate the power and potential of sustainable transport to create jobs, grow the economy and improve health outcomes for all.

e-Mobility or specifically Electro mobility represents the concept of using electric power-train technologies, in-vehicle information, and communication technologies and connected infrastructures to enable the electric propulsion of vehicles and fleets.

Powertrain technologies include full electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, as well as hydrogen fuel cell vehicles that convert hydrogen into electricity.

e-Mobility efforts are motivated by the need to address corporate fuel efficiency and emission requirements, as well as market demands for lower operational costs.

The E-Mobility Technology showcase event in the capital Kigali

Road map for e-mobility transition in Rwanda

Since Electric vehicles (EV) are gaining popularity among both governments and the private sector globally as an energy efficient mobility technology, Rwanda embraces the fact that their expansion is now inevitable, as they aim to scale up their nascent e-moto industry.

Researchers recommend e-mobility be implemented in the context of a wider vision and set of policies that increase person-carrying capacity of roads, implement complete streets and integrate different modes of transport.

The researchers suggest that government of Rwanda identifies a viable market segment of early EV adopters, and apply a combination of fiscal incentives including price subsidies, well-targeted tax breaks, and non-fiscal incentives to increase e-mobility in the early stages.

According to statistics (2020), Rwanda has 221,000 registered vehicles consisting of 52% motorcycles and 38% passenger vehicles of which at least 30,000 are in Kigali.

The number of vehicles is increasing rapidly (almost 12% per year) and the government is thus concerned about deteriorating air quality in Kigali and rising fuel import bills (12% of total imports).

A recent EV study recommended that government should aim to convert 30% of motorcycles, 8% of cars, 20% buses and 25% of mini and micro buses to electric power, by 2030, although senior officials and private sector firms have expressed their desire for a faster transition, especially in e-motos.

Currently, Volkswagen is also exploring electric mobility solutions and Global Green Growth Institute is studying the possibility of introducing e-buses.

Electrification of motorbikes will improve air quality and therefore health outcomes, cut carbon emissions (from about 55.1 grams per kilometre for ICE-motos to about 13.3 grams per kilometre for e-motos),

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Harley-Davidson Releases U$30,000 Electric Motorcycle

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Motocycle enthusiasts have something unique awaiting release from Harley-Davidson.

The electric motorcycle Harley-Davidson is rolling out this year, it hopes will capture the imagination of a new generation of riders. Harley-Davidson has been testing this electric motorcycle for more than four years.

This new monster costs nearly U$30,000 and can go zero to 60 mph in three seconds. There is no clutch and no shifting.

Harley’s traditional, non-electric motorcycles range from about U$6,900 for a compact, urban model to nearly U$44,000 for a fully-loaded touring bike.

It Features high-quality Brembo brakes, fully adjustable Showa suspension, Michelin sports tires, improved anti-lock brakes for cornering, traction control, etc.

Apart from its electric motor, another feature that makes the LiveWire a different bike is its large number of online services .

Its Telematic Control Unit, placed under the seat, allows the user to access all the functionalities from his smartphone .

You can check data such as the status of the motorcycle, the level of battery charge or information about the trip in progress.

In addition, it has a s alarm system that notifies at the moment if you are stealing the motorcycle or if it is the object of some type of vandalism.

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