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Airtel Rwanda Launches NkundaURwanda Campaign Inviting people to “Shine on Rwanda”

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Airtel Rwanda has today launched an exciting, user contest campaign dubbed “NkundaUrwanda” that will reward the love stories shared on its digital platforms. The stories with the highest engagement will win 1 (one) of 3 (three) superfast PocketWifis, a starter Pack of 30GB of free Data.

According to a statement release by Airtel Rwanda, “We sought to make this month even more special by inviting everyone, in a language of their choice, to express their heartfelt Love for Rwanda. Stories could be about anything that our customers, citizens and residents of Rwanda feel passionate about,” Airtel said.

“We will award 50 winners everyday with a PocketWifi, a superfast mobile router can connect up to 10 devices to enable remote working and online studies, free 30GB of Data for each device. This device has become the perfect companion for all that seek to remain connected at all times,” Airtel Added.

Airtel added that stories submitted by the users of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram social media platforms can range from ones love and appreciation of personalities, about frontline workers such as Doctors, Nurses and the Police, supermarket workers, pharmacists, farmers and everyone who has contributed to keep us safe during the Global Pandemic. Entries can also be about ones love for a sports club, a service such as Irembo or our beautiful road network.

“Write your #NkundaUrwanda Love Story, post it on your own platform or on Airtel’s Twitter @airtelrw, Facebook @airtelrwanda or Instagram airtelrw platform, tag as many of your friends and followers and you could on of three daily winners” the statement added.

The hashtags for the campaign are #NoLockDownOnLove #NkundaUrwanda #LoveIsRed

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Lifestyle

Father Ubald Rugirangoga’s Body Flown To Rwanda

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The remains of Father Ubald Rugirangoga have been flown back to Rwanda as family and friends prepare for burial.

The plane carrying the body of the priest touched ground at Kigali International Airport on Saturday night.

Rugirangoga  died at 65 on January 7th of complications from Covid-19. He was a Catholic priest well-known throughout Africa and often preached to congregations of more than 30,000 in Rwanda.

He died from Utah, United States where he was being treated.

According to Celestin Hakizimana, Bishop of Gikongoro Diocese and Apostolic Administrator of Cyangugu Diocese where Rugirangoga was serving, the deceased succumbed to respiratory complications.

Another Rwandan Priest Twagirumukiza Succumbs To Covid-19

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Lifestyle

Admired Ghanaian Photographer Passes On

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Emmanuel Bobbie, popularly known as Bob Pixel, was a popular Ghanaian celebrity photographer. He is no more.

It is unknown when Bob Pixel passed or the cause of his death.

The news of his death has shocked fans and followers on social media, who have been admiring his handwork for a long time.

Bob Pixel was known for his legendary talent and was always applauded for capturing stunning images across Ghana.

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Lifestyle

Did Isaac Newton Have A PHD?

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No, Isaac Newton never received a PhD, nor any other doctorate. As was the case of the vast majority of English academics before the 20th century, his highest qualification was a Master of Arts (MA) degree.

And, even today, an MA from Oxford or Cambridge implies no further study or work beyond the Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree.

The BA turns into an MA provided only that seven years have passed since the person first matriculated as a student.

For a very long time, the normal route to an academic career in England was to complete the BA degree (which entailed three or four years of study, followed by the passing of comprehensive final examinations) brilliantly enough to be rewarded with a college fellowship.

That meant that one could continue to live at the college and collect a stipend, provided only that one didn’t marry and wasn’t convicted of a felony. The more intellectually enterprising individuals could then advance to a tutorship, lectureship, readership, and perhaps finally to a professorship (which is, even today, a rank held by few academics at Oxford or Cambridge).

The English universities did grant some doctorates, but only to very senior academics, usually clergymen. The current system of further specialized study after the bachelor’s degree, followed by the preparation and defense of a dissertation containing original research and leading to a PhD, was introduced in the University of Berlin in 1810 and it wasn’t adopted in Britain until the 1920s.

For a while after the research PhD was adopted by British universities in the 20th century, it was regarded as downmarket, being essentially a means by which someone who hadn’t been sufficiently brilliant to obtain a fellowship after completing the BA might have another shot at establishing an academic career.

Newton matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge in June of 1661. He was originally a “subsizar”, meaning that he had to act as a servant to wealthier students, in exchange for a reduction in his fees.

In 1664 he earned a scholarship that provided him with living expenses for another four years, until he received his MA.

In April of 1667 he was elected as fellow of Trinity College, meaning that he could stay there as long as he wished.

In 1669, Newton was chosen to succeed Isaac Barrow as the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics. Newton was only 26 years old and had yet to publish anything, but Barrow knew him to be a mathematical genius and had recommended him for the post.

This wasn’t unusual at a time when the academic career wasn’t intrinsically tied to publication, or even to research in the modern sense.

This article was first published in the Quora.

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